rhamphotheca

rhamphotheca:

How Languages Evolve:

Explained in a Winning TED-Ed Animation

by Ayun Halliday

Language. It’s as adaptable as Darwin’s finches.

It’d be interesting to know how the Internet changes the game. Seems like it would go a long way toward democratizing the process by which lingo gets mingled.

Alex Gendler’s TED-Ed lesson, winningly animated by Igor Coric, rolls back the clock to a time when communal groups would subdivide and strike out on their own, usually in order to beef up the food supply.

This sort of geographic and temporal separation was bound to take a toll, linguistically. Evolution is need-based. Vocabulary and pronunciation eventually betray the specifics of the speaker’s surroundings, their circumstances and needs…

(read more: Open Culture)

natebear

leseanthomas:

Many of these rates (before taxes, might I add) haven’t changed in 20 years. $100-$250 in 1994 aint the same as in 2014. This is why Comic Book Conventions for many comic illustrators, in many cases, are the lifeblood of their comic making (commissions, direct fan interaction books sales). 

Support your local mainstream or indie comic artist!!!!

Source: http://www.ehow.com/info_8068093_much-artist-make-per-project.html

Makes me glad I earn money through graphic design instead, 

rhamphotheca

rhamphotheca:

Fish Out of Water Learn to Walk

Around 400 million years ago, fish left the water and started to evolve into land-loving creatures. But how did the transition happen? A new and unusual experiment could shed some light on the kinds of changes that enabled fins to become limbs. Researchers took a fish species known to be able to walk on its fins from time to time, and raised it on land. Watch the fish promenade in this Nature Video.

Read the paper: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature13708

Read the News & Views: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature13743

Totally unscientific question but I just want to know: did the land-raised bichirs ever get to swim in water? I kinda feel bad for the little guys, being forced out of their element :(

rhamphotheca
rhamphotheca:

Ancient Life Forms fed Through Fractal Arms
by Andy Coughlan
Is it a tree? Is it a fern? No, it’s a rangeomorph, one of the first complex organisms to evolve on Earth. A new analysis of their fossils suggests that rangeomorphs’ strange bodies evolved to absorb as much food as possible from the surrounding water.
Rangeomorphs ruled the oceans for around 40 million years, beginning 575 million years ago, in a period called the Ediacaran. Before them, life was microscopic.
They grew on the sea bed, far too deep to harvest sunlight for photosynthesis. Up to 2 metres long, they had no organs, mouths or means of moving, so they had to passively absorb nutrients from the surrounding water…
(read more: New Scientist)
illustration via: University of Cambridge

rhamphotheca:

Ancient Life Forms fed Through Fractal Arms

by Andy Coughlan

Is it a tree? Is it a fern? No, it’s a rangeomorph, one of the first complex organisms to evolve on Earth. A new analysis of their fossils suggests that rangeomorphs’ strange bodies evolved to absorb as much food as possible from the surrounding water.

Rangeomorphs ruled the oceans for around 40 million years, beginning 575 million years ago, in a period called the Ediacaran. Before them, life was microscopic.

They grew on the sea bed, far too deep to harvest sunlight for photosynthesis. Up to 2 metres long, they had no organs, mouths or means of moving, so they had to passively absorb nutrients from the surrounding water…

(read more: New Scientist)

illustration via: University of Cambridge

Assassin’s Creed Unity Meets Parkour in Real Life - 4K!
I’ve never played Assassin’s Creed, but this video has some really nice acrobatics and cinematography. I’d watch a good 30 minutes video of just this (I think a 2 hour movie would be pushing it though)