rhamphotheca

rhamphotheca:

Fish Out of Water Learn to Walk

Around 400 million years ago, fish left the water and started to evolve into land-loving creatures. But how did the transition happen? A new and unusual experiment could shed some light on the kinds of changes that enabled fins to become limbs. Researchers took a fish species known to be able to walk on its fins from time to time, and raised it on land. Watch the fish promenade in this Nature Video.

Read the paper: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature13708

Read the News & Views: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature13743

Totally unscientific question but I just want to know: did the land-raised bichirs ever get to swim in water? I kinda feel bad for the little guys, being forced out of their element :(

rhamphotheca
rhamphotheca:

Ancient Life Forms fed Through Fractal Arms
by Andy Coughlan
Is it a tree? Is it a fern? No, it’s a rangeomorph, one of the first complex organisms to evolve on Earth. A new analysis of their fossils suggests that rangeomorphs’ strange bodies evolved to absorb as much food as possible from the surrounding water.
Rangeomorphs ruled the oceans for around 40 million years, beginning 575 million years ago, in a period called the Ediacaran. Before them, life was microscopic.
They grew on the sea bed, far too deep to harvest sunlight for photosynthesis. Up to 2 metres long, they had no organs, mouths or means of moving, so they had to passively absorb nutrients from the surrounding water…
(read more: New Scientist)
illustration via: University of Cambridge

rhamphotheca:

Ancient Life Forms fed Through Fractal Arms

by Andy Coughlan

Is it a tree? Is it a fern? No, it’s a rangeomorph, one of the first complex organisms to evolve on Earth. A new analysis of their fossils suggests that rangeomorphs’ strange bodies evolved to absorb as much food as possible from the surrounding water.

Rangeomorphs ruled the oceans for around 40 million years, beginning 575 million years ago, in a period called the Ediacaran. Before them, life was microscopic.

They grew on the sea bed, far too deep to harvest sunlight for photosynthesis. Up to 2 metres long, they had no organs, mouths or means of moving, so they had to passively absorb nutrients from the surrounding water…

(read more: New Scientist)

illustration via: University of Cambridge

Assassin’s Creed Unity Meets Parkour in Real Life - 4K!
I’ve never played Assassin’s Creed, but this video has some really nice acrobatics and cinematography. I’d watch a good 30 minutes video of just this (I think a 2 hour movie would be pushing it though)

Just completed my latest carousel book. All silkscreen printed, cut , glued and bound by hand. It takes me 2.5 hours to build one book, and I printed enough pages for 30 books, so I’ve got a lot of work to do.

The subject is black and white ruffed lemurs and habitat loss. The pop-up nature of the book makes it hard to see the background, but I assure you I drew a fire and burned out trees.